Month: March 2014 (page 2 of 2)

Family Photography Tips – The Family Photo Show Love with Each Other

Perhaps the most difficult image to set up and pull off a group family photo. These photos are only really work when everyone is on the same page, looking at the camera and smiling at the same time. Synchronization getting everyone to say “cheese” is a typical way to get everyone smiling. However, it does not always work. It is a modern world and we are a modern … family! No matter what your family members are the chances that you’ll love to capture their smiles, laughs and happy times of our newest century and the latest technology. Cameras and Photography have come a long way since they were first invented, so do not feel bad if you are not completely caught up with all the methods out there.

Put the group quietly – It is important that all participants in the picture and is easy and comfortable with each other, as well as a photographer. If the photographer also happens to be a family member, then quietly should not be a problem. In the middle of strangers, relax in front of the camera is not the problem.

Move the scene – do not be afraid to move to the scene, cutting out the background and focus only on the people. Crop taller people at the top of the head, in order to emphasize the connection between family members. Allow family and love drama played before the camera. Allow family members to communicate before snapping the picture. Saying “cheese” and is always listed as one of the most important family photography tips are not always good, and that people harden and become less straight, so sit back and let them comfortably. A good snapshot of how you look.

Blur the background – Blurring the background makes people more dramatic aspect. This makes the family spotlight, because, after all, a family is what you’re shooting.

Straight Group – There is always someone in the family collection, which does not want to sit for a picture. Today, small compact cameras, it is easy to get candid photos without cause at all. Hold the camera in your pocket as you work the room. Find your shot and shoot it up and quickly. It takes practice, but it does not come out to grab photos and with a little thought and attention.

Some photos consumption – When trying to capture all in one group, the only real successful way to do this is to take lots of pictures, and quickly. Shooting fast bursts of three or four shots at a time will get a good shot for which you are looking for. Usually the first shot throwaway shot. However, probably the second or third keeper. Shoot some shots before everyone is ready. Some of the best photos of the actual organization of seated activity.

Timing is everything – Define your time carefully will make or break a shot. However, it is true, the time can only be learned with practice. Another one of the proposals that tops the list of family photography tips, the sooner you learn to write or know what you want composition, the better will be your time. Try to work through the natural image flow of events when the family is together naturally and not artificially raise, making them stronger.

Lighting – No matter what type of photography, lighting is probably the most important element. In many cases, small flash will be sufficient. However, larger family groups may require more lighting. Taking photos at the natural light makes it easier and less stressful shot.

Take control – This is the most important photographer to keep the situation under control, and communication is the key. Speak your objects to make them understand what you want to do, and they need to make a happy situation. If you have a really large group photo, then use a tripod and have someone act as your assistant.

Smile – Finally, there’s nothing worse than a grumpy old photographer, so smile. That will give all the others who have to participate freely. Have fun, act like you are using the process. It’s good to crack a joke or two to get everyone to loosen. And do not be afraid to be creative. Think outside the box. A group can be set without sitting next to each other standing in attention for the next line. Highlight other elements of the “family-ness”. Play with it. Enjoy!

Engage in funny faces or waving stuffed toys for their children “perform” chamber. Just shoot as usual, but he eventually grow around the camera. You can not always get a smile, but you always get the genuine reactions from your kids!

High Fashion Photography

High Fashion Photography is a form of photography that is in a league of its own, there is nothing else quite like it. Most people probably see a fashion shoot in a magazine and while they recognize its a higher quality than their family portraits or baby photos they think it all happens the same way. Throw out a backdrop stick the person in front of it and snap a photo. They dont realise it takes a team of people to do a fashion shoot, not a single person. There is a lot of factors that go into high fashion photography that you just dont need for other photo shoots. In this article I will discuss some of the key points to having a successful photo shoot.

Lighting, as with most photography is very important. However with high fashion photography lighting is used differently. Where in a normal family portrait you just want a steady light that shows up each face nicely in front of the camera, in high fashion you can use the lighting to create shadows on certain parts of the model or clothes, have half the face dark and half light, whatever you want. These extra effects with the lighting is what seperates the great fashion photographers from the mediocre. Of course if you have a great team that helps too.

High Fashion Photography Teams

Having a great team of people at your disposal is essential to having good success in this field. Generally if youre shooting high fashion you want to use the best make-up artist and stylist that you can afford. You should also have an assistant that knows how you use your lights and how you set up a shoot. Having quality staff will ensure a high standard of readiness and preparation for the shoot. If the model and the clothes look good and the set is perfect then the shoot is that much easier for you.

High Fashion Photography secrets to great shots

A good photographer will know that anything that isnt in the photo is irrelevant. But what does that mean exactly? It means that if youre shooting a model from the front it doesnt matter what is on the back of the model because it wont be in the photo. This means that you can have all kinds of pins, tape, etc hidden at the back pulling the clothes in just the right way for the shoot because it wont be in the photo, but it gives you much more freedom to create the kind of shot youre looking for. This goes for fans and the like also, you can see the effect of the fan or prop in the photo but not the prop itself. Keeping this in mind you can create some unique and lasting effects for your high fashion photography .

Professional Photography 10 Character Traits Of A True Pro

The most professional and very successful photographers that I have worked with during my own twenty-year professional creative career have all shared certain character traits. By developing these traits yourself, you can fast-track your own photography career development.

1. The ideal ‘Perfect Photographer’ needs to have a powerhouse work ethic. They accomplish things in a day that ordinary mortals take weeks to do. They seem unstoppable. They know their time is valuable – irreplaceable actually – and don’t waste it watching TV or on Yahoo Messenger.

2. The Perfect Photographer is very easy to get along with, has great people skills, an excellent sense of humor and people naturally like working with them.

3. The Perfect Photographer is genuinely curious, interested and fascinated by their craft and loves innovation and inspiration from any source – a beginner or otherwise.

4. The Perfect Photographer maintains composure in stressful situations where others flounder and lose control of the situation and possibly themselves. In this sense, the Perfect Photographer inspires trust, confidence and belief because they are unflappable and unfazed by almost anything.

5. The Perfect Photographer is always experimenting with new approaches, new tricks, new lenses, new software etc. In short, they don’t become cynical, bored, lazy or complacent with their skill level and are always enthusiastic and eager to find out cool new stuff.

6. The Perfect Photographer has clarity and knows precisely what they are aiming for at the final stage of output, e.g. a giant billboard poster, at the earliest stages of input e.g. conceptual planning. Small modifications early on in a project can have absolutely massive implications for a project later. The Perfect Photographer is always aware of this and is flexibly adapting, responding and problem-solving at each stage with the optimum later final output always in mind.

7. The Perfect Photographer is completely generous and recognizes the fundamental importance of humbly giving back some of their accumulated wisdom, experience or even money. They are a giver, not a taker.

8. The Perfect Photographer knows how to say ‘no’ politely. It does not matter who the ‘no’ is to, they are excellent at doing it in an inclusive and polite way that actually makes the other party respect her or him more, instead of less.

9. The Perfect Photographer has integrity and can be depended on, no matter what. If the Perfect Photographer says that they will deliver something, they will. If they genuinely cannot due to unforeseen problems, they communicate constantly with the person that they have made the commitment to so that the situation is crystal clear to everyone involved.

10. They are not at all egotistical and are motivated by their humble love of the process, the craft, the art, the science, of what they do. They are not interested in fame (but know how to promote their work to maximum effect) or extravagant wealth (but get paid a fortune) but instead feel like a ‘servant’ to the art of photography – if that is not too corny.

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