Tag: DSLR camera

Could a London photography tour help you to get to know your DSLR camera

The digital single lens reflex camera – or the DSLR camera, to give its more familiar name – is a digital camera for still images that is characterised by a single lens reflex (SLR) mechanism. Single lens reflex cameras have long been common in the world of professional photography, but may be less well-known to those who are only just developing an interest in photography. DSLR cameras are mainly distinguished from standard digital cameras by two key features: their removable lenses and the ability that they give users to see the image through the actual picture lens.

However, while DSLR cameras feature various controls that help to make a final picture look as good as possible, they are obviously fairly redundant if the would-be photographer has little idea how to use them. A beginner photographer may also be interested in increasing their understanding of composition, which can help them to create a far greater number of truly great photographs. But although it is possible for such individuals to read a book or even browse the Internet for some tips on using a DSLR camera, people tend to learn best when their education feels a little less passive, and a little more fun.

It is for such reasons that one may be tempted to enrol on a London photography tour. The English capital is within easy reach of a wide range of people, and offers plenty of stimulating sights that make for great photographs – even when taken by newcomers to DSLR cameras and London photography courses. There are various London photography courses to choose from, too, with the best of them being led by capable, informative and helpful tutors. Another thing that helps to distinguish the best London photography tour from the rest is if it encompasses some of the most visually interesting places in the capital, such as the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, St Paul’s Cathedral and the South Bank, to cite just a few examples.

Storing your Photography Equipment

Professional photographers are very careful how they store all their expensive photographic equipment. Although you may not be a professional photographer, you may be struggling to decide how you are going to store whatever equipment you have. Many of us have more than one camera and are not sure how to keep them safe.

Before you invest a lot of money into a camera bag, it is important that you take stock of what equipment you own and think about what purpose your bag will serve. If you are like me, you own a small point and shoot camera, and a larger DSLR camera with some additional lenses. I tend to carry my cameras with me when I go on holiday and to family members’ houses on special occasions like Christmas or birthdays. For this reason, I have never invested in a large camera bag to carry all my equipment as I don’t go on professional shoots and when I do travel with my camera I try to keep what I take to a minimum. I like to put my camera in my carry-on bag to keep it safe, so I don’t like to carry too much equipment. I own a small camcorder that I sometimes take with me also, but I have never had the need to invest in a camera bag that holds all my cameras and equipment at once because I usually take only one camera with me at a time. There are some occasions when I want to take video as well as stills and in this case, I will take my camcorder as well as my small point and shoot camera to avoid being overloaded with heavy cameras.

In my home, I store all my equipment together on a shelf in my closet. I keep accessories like chargers and extra memory cards on this shelf, also, in a clear plastic bin so that I know where everything is and it is easily accessible. Keeping all your equipment together is usually the best way to store it. This prevents loss of equipment and wasted time spent searching for items.

There are many people, however, who like to carry all their equipment with them at once. This is especially true of photographers who are very skilled at taking photos and like to switch lenses and frequently use a tripod to take photos. This type of photographer should own a good sturdy bag to hold all their valuable equipment. Professional photographers use backpacks so they can easily carry with them all their gear when they are shooting on location. There are many different types of camera bags that can be purchased and although they may be more expensive than a regular carry bag or backpack, they will protect all your cameras from damage. If you own a great bag, you will have very little need for a designated shelf or box in your house as most, if not all, of your equipment will be stored in the bag. Nevertheless, keeping everything to do with photography in one place will help you stay organized and save you time in the long run.

Dslr Cameras

DSLR, expand to form Digital Single-Lens Reflex cameras are the digital cameras that direct light from the lens to an optical viewfinder on the back of the camera through the implementation of mechanical mirror system and Pentaprism.

DSLR Cameras: Most preferred by Professional Photographers

These cameras are widely preferred by professional still photographers as

They allow accurate preview of framing close to the moment of exposure.
Allow its user to choose from a number of interchangeable lenses.
Allows accurate preview of depth of field.
Larger sensors in contrast to compact digital cameras that allow for similar depths of fields and picture angle to film formats, and even high signal to noise ratio.

Digital Point-and-shoot Vs DSLR Cameras:

The reflex design scheme is what primarily differentiates a DSLR from a digital point-and-shoot camera that exposes the sensor constantly to the light projected by the lens and allows the cameras screen to be used as an electronic viewfinder.

HDSLRs: The High Definition DSLRs that were introduced in 2009 had a video mode in addition to the still photography mode. The video mode allowed its user to record high definition motion video. The Nikon D90 was the first DSLR camera to shoot and capture HD video.

DSLR Timeline:

1991: Kodak was the first to release the commercially available DSLR camera, Kodak DCS-100.
1999: Nikon D1, the first DSLR camera to replace film cameras in the professional photo journalism and sports photography field.
2000 (January): Fujifilms Fine Pix S1 Pro, first DSLR camera to have been marketed to non-professionals.
2004: Konica Minolta Maxxum 7D, first DSLR with in-body image stabilization.
2009: Nikon D90, first DSLR camera with video recording.

Market Share: As of 2008, Canon and Nikon had a whooping share of 41% and 40% respectively whereas Sony and Olympus each had only 6% market share. The duopoly of Canon and Nikon is often referred to as Nikanon or Canikon on online forums.

Popular Brands: Canon, Nikon, Kodak, Pentax, Olympus, Panasonic, Samsung, Konica Minolta, Fujifilm and Sigma.

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